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About Erik Ness

Somewhere around the age of thirteen I decided I wanted to bake a quiche. It was 1979 and people were already making fun of quiche, deriding it as preppy and foreign and not sufficiently masculine. But a close friend of my grandmother had just published a cookbook, and I wanted to know: What is a quiche? The resulting labors kindled a lifelong interest in cooking, as well as a capacity to destroy a kitchen in short order. I worked as a cook for several seasons at a campus café in college, then for one winter at a wilderness lodge.

In the more than 30 years since I’ve written about science, health, and the environment for a variety of local and national publications. I’ve even occasionally written about food. My professional website is here, and is a tad out of date.

Since 2010 I’ve been personally exploring the challenge of nightshade sensitivity. When I began looking into the details and possible scientific explanations, I found both the tell-tale signs of quackery and a few bread crumbs of evidence that suggested a few plausible hypotheses.

The No Nightshade Kitchen captures the lessons I’ve learned as I’ve reinvented myself as a cook and expanded my understanding of the complex science that connects food and health.

explore!

Three glass vessels on a wooden background. A small one contains peppercorns. A larger round one contains yellow corn chips. A square container has Two Alarm No Nightshade Chili, so ground beef and kidney beans in a red sauce.

Two Alarm No Nightshade Chili

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Chili often brings out the purists. Some people claim it shouldn't have beans. Others get up in arms about tomatoes. So let’s really freak them...

Sri Lankan Spoof Mix

Vegetarian Baked Beans

pad thai

No Nightshade Pad Thai

currt cabbage in a bowl on a board

Cabbage Sabzi

On Oil

no nightshade minestrone soup

Minestrone Soup

Beetuto, a Tomato Like Base